A meta-analysis of experiments testing the effects of a neonicotinoid insecticide (imidacloprid) on honey bees

@article{Cresswell2011AMO,
  title={A meta-analysis of experiments testing the effects of a neonicotinoid insecticide (imidacloprid) on honey bees},
  author={James E Cresswell},
  journal={Ecotoxicology},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={149-157}
}
Honey bees provide important pollination services to crops and wild plants. The agricultural use of systemic insecticides, such as neonicotinoids, may harm bees through their presence in pollen and nectar, which bees consume. Many studies have tested the effects on honey bees of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid, but a clear picture of the risk it poses to bees has not previously emerged, because investigations are methodologically varied and inconsistent in outcome. In a meta-analysis of fourteen… Expand
Neonicotinoids in bees: a review on concentrations, side-effects and risk assessment
TLDR
The proposed risk assessment scheme for systemic compounds was shown to be applicable to assess the risk for side-effects of neonicotinoids as it considers the effect on different life stages and different levels of biological organization (organism versus colony). Expand
Sub-lethal concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides at the field level affect negatively honey yield: Evidence from a 6-year survey of Greek apiaries
TLDR
By simulating a scenario with ideal pathogenic and environmental conditions, it is found that the magnitude of the neonicotinoid effects decreases significantly under ideal conditions providing evidence for possible synergies at the field between neonicsotinoids and environmental and pathogenic factors. Expand
Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development
TLDR
Adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior are shown for the first time and risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure. Expand
Differential sensitivity of honey bees and bumble bees to a dietary insecticide (imidacloprid).
TLDR
It is speculated that honey bees are better pre-adapted than bumble bees to feed on nectars containing synthetic alkaloids, such as imidacloprid, by virtue of their ancestral adaptation to tropical nectar in which natural alkaloid are prevalent. Expand
Neonicotinoid Insecticides and Their Impacts on Bees: A Systematic Review of Research Approaches and Identification of Knowledge Gaps
TLDR
It is suggested that effects on the individual bee should be linked to both mechanisms at the sub-individual level and also to the consequences for the colony and wider bee populations as bees are increasingly facing multiple interacting pressures. Expand
Impact of Chronic Neonicotinoid Exposure on Honeybee Colony Performance and Queen Supersedure
TLDR
Sublethal neonicotinoid exposure did not provoke increased winter losses, yet significant detrimental short and long-term impacts on colony performance and queen fate suggest that neonicsotinoids may contribute to colony weakening in a complex manner. Expand
Lethal and sublethal effects of thiamethoxam, a neonicotinoid molecule, on colony performance of A. mellifera
TLDR
Under field conditions, average bee activity remained statistically low up to the 12th day after spray on mustard bloom in comparison to pre-count and control, and the effect of thiamethoxam under field conditions was less pronounced for bee mortality and colony parameters. Expand
Sublethal Effects of Imidacloprid on Honey Bee Colony Growth and Activity at Three Sites in the U.S.
TLDR
Honey bee colonies fed sublethal concentrations of imidacloprid over 6 weeks in field trials at a desert site, a site near intensive agriculture, and a site with little nearby agriculture but abundant natural forage were monitored with respect to colony metrics, such as adult bee and brood population sizes, as well as pesticide residues. Expand
Effects of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid pesticide, on reproduction in worker bumble bees (Bombus terrestris)
TLDR
It is speculated that the detrimental effects of imidacloprid on fecundity emerge principally from nutrient limitation imposed by the failure of individuals to feed, and that to fully evaluate impacts on wild colonies it will be necessary to establish the effect of dietary neonicotinoids on the fecundities of bumble bee queens. Expand
Fungicides, herbicides and bees: A systematic review of existing research and methods
TLDR
This review found that most studies have been carried out in Europe and the USA, and investigated effects on honeybees, and certain effects are well represented in the literature in comparison to others, such as sub-lethal effects. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 66 REFERENCES
Does Imidacloprid Seed-Treated Maize Have an Impact on Honey Bee Mortality?
TLDR
The hypothesis that imidacloprid seed-treated maize has no negative impact on honey bees is supported, and a significant correlation between the number of colonies per apiary and the mortality rates in an apiary is found. Expand
Abnormal Foraging Behavior Induced by Sublethal Dosage of Imidacloprid in the Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that sublethal dosages of imidacloprid were able to affect foraging behavior of honey bees and showed abnormalities in revisiting the feeding site. Expand
Risk assessment for side-effects of neonicotinoids against bumblebees with and without impairing foraging behavior
TLDR
It is recommended that behavior tests should be included in risk assessment tests for highly toxic pesticides because impairment of the foraging behavior can result in a decreased pollination, lower reproduction and finally in colony mortality due to a lack of food. Expand
Modes of honeybees exposure to systemic insecticides: estimated amounts of contaminated pollen and nectar consumed by different categories of bees
TLDR
Estimates for modes of honeybees exposure to systemic insecticides by estimating their pollen and nectar consumption are given for larvae and for the categories of adults which consume the highest amounts of - pollen, the nurse bees, and - nectar. Expand
Does Cry1Ab protein affect learning performances of the honey bee Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera, Apidae)?
TLDR
Results show that transgenic crops expressing Cry1Ab protein at 5000 ppb may affect food consumption or learning processes and thereby may impact honey bee foraging efficiency and the implications are discussed in terms of risks of transgenic Bt crops for honey bees. Expand
Effects of imidacloprid administered in sub-lethal doses on honey bee behaviour. Laboratory tests
TLDR
Investigating if imidacloprid, provided in sub-lethal doses, could influence honey bee behaviour in the laboratory found that in the treated bees, the communicative capacity seemed to be impaired, and this could cause a decline in the social behaviour. Expand
Safety of imidacloprid seed dressings to honey bees: a comprehensive overview and compilation of the current state of knowledge
This paper reviews the available data on the risk potential posed by imidacloprid seed dressings to honey bees. Key studies are briefly described and their results are discussed; of particularExpand
Translocation of Neonicotinoid Insecticides from Coated Seeds to Seedling Guttation Drops: A Novel Way of Intoxication for Bees
TLDR
It is shown that leaf guttation drops of all the corn plants germinated from neonicotinoid-coated seeds contained amounts of insecticide constantly higher than 10mg/1, with maxima up to 100 mg/1 for thiamethoxam and clothianidin, and up to 200 mg/ 1 for imidacloprid. Expand
Effects of sub-lethal imidacloprid doses on the homing rate and foraging activity of honey bees
TLDR
The results show that almost all the control honey bees returned to the hive, and started again visiting the feeder between 2 to 5 hours after the release, and they were not seen during the following 24 hours, neither at the hive nor at the feeding site. Expand
Risk posed to honeybees (Apis mellifera L, Hymenoptera) by an imidacloprid seed dressing of sunflowers.
In a greenhouse metabolism study, sunflowers were seed-treated with radiolabelled imidacloprid in a 700 g kg-1 WS formulation (Gaucho WS 70) at 0.7 mg AI per seed, and the nature of the resultingExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...