A mega-analysis of genome-wide association studies for major depressive disorder

@article{Ripke2013AMO,
  title={A mega-analysis of genome-wide association studies for major depressive disorder},
  author={Stephan Ripke and Naomi R. Wray and Cathryn M. Lewis and Steven P. Hamilton and Myrna M. Weissman and Gerome D. Breen and Enda M. Byrne and Douglas H.R. Blackwood and Dorret I. Boomsma and Sven Cichon and Andrew C. Heath and Florian Holsboer and Susanne Lucae and Pamela A. F. Madden and Nicholas G. Martin and Peter McGuffin and Pierandrea Muglia and Markus M. Noethen and Brenda Penninx and Michele L. Pergadia and James B. Potash and Marcella Rietschel and D. Y. Lin and Bertram M{\"u}ller-Myhsok and Jianxin Shi and Stacy Steinberg and Hans J{\"o}rgen Grabe and Paul Lichtenstein and Patrik K. E. Magnusson and Roy H. Perlis and Martin Preisig and Jordan W. Smoller and K{\'a}ri Stef{\'a}nsson and Rudolf Uher and Zolt{\'a}n Kutalik and Katherine E. Tansey and Alexander Teumer and Alexander Viktorin and Michael R. Barnes and Thomas Bettecken and Elisabeth B. Binder and Ren{\'e} Breuer and Victor M. Castro and Susanne E. Churchill and William H Coryell and Nick Craddock and Ian W. Craig and Darina Czamara and Eco J. C. de Geus and Franziska Degenhardt and Anne Farmer and Maurizio Fava and Josef Frank and Vivian S. Gainer and Patience J. Gallagher and Scott D. Gordon and Sergey Goryachev and Magdalena Gross and Michel Guipponi and Anjali K. Henders and Stefan Herms and Ian B. Hickie and Susanne Hoefels and Witte J. G. Hoogendijk and Jouke- Jan Hottenga and Dan V. Iosifescu and Marcus Ising and Ian R Jones and Lisa Jones and Tzeng Jung-Ying and James A. Knowles and Isaac S. Kohane and Martin A. Kohli and Ania Korszun and Mikael Land{\'e}n and William B Lawson and Glyn Lewis and Donald J. Macintyre and Wolfgang Maier and Manuel Mattheisen and Patrick J. McGrath and Andrew M. McIntosh and Alan McLean and Christel M. Middeldorp and Lefkos T. Middleton and Grant Montgomery and Shawn N. Murphy and Matthias Nauck and Willem A. Nolen and Dale R. Nyholt and Michael C. O'Donovan and Hogni Oskarsson and Nancy L. Pedersen and William A. Scheftner and Andrea Schulz and Thomas G. Schulze and Stanley I. Shyn and Engilbert Sigurdsson and Susan L. Slager and Johannes H. Smit and Hreinn Stef{\'a}nsson and Michael Steffens and Thorgeir E. Thorgeirsson and Federica Tozzi and Jens Treutlein and Manfred Uhr and Edwin J.C.G. van den Oord and Gerard van Grootheest and Henry V{\"o}lzke and Jeffrey Weilburg and Gonneke Willemsen and Frans G Zitman and Benjamin M. Neale and Mark Daly and Douglas F. Levinson and Patrick F. Sullivan},
  journal={Molecular Psychiatry},
  year={2013},
  volume={18},
  pages={497-511}
}
Prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) have met with limited success. We sought to increase statistical power to detect disease loci by conducting a GWAS mega-analysis for MDD. In the MDD discovery phase, we analyzed more than 1.2 million autosomal and X chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 759 independent and unrelated subjects of recent European ancestry (9240 MDD cases and 9519 controls). In the MDD replication phase, we evaluated… Expand
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