A mechanistic account of the mirror effect for word frequency: a computational model of remember-know judgments in a continuous recognition paradigm.

@article{Reder2000AMA,
  title={A mechanistic account of the mirror effect for word frequency: a computational model of remember-know judgments in a continuous recognition paradigm.},
  author={Lynne M. Reder and Adisack Nhouyvanisvong and Christian D. Schunn and Michael S. Ayers and Paige Angstadt and Kazuo Hiraki},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2000},
  volume={26 2},
  pages={294-320}
}
A theoretical account of the mirror effect for word frequency and of dissociations in the pattern of responding Remember vs. Know (R vs. K) for low- and high-frequency words was tested both empirically and computationally by comparing predicted with observed data theory in 3 experiments. The SAC (Source of Activation Confusion) theory of memory makes the novel prediction of more K responses for high- than for low-frequency words, for both old and new items. Two experiments used a continuous… CONTINUE READING
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