A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.

Abstract

Environmental and hormonal signals cause reorganization of microtubule arrays in higher plants, but the mechanisms driving these transitions have remained elusive. The organization of these arrays is required to direct morphogenesis. We discovered that microtubule severing by the protein katanin plays a crucial and unexpected role in the reorientation of cortical arrays, as triggered by blue light. Imaging and genetic experiments revealed that phototropin photoreceptors stimulate katanin-mediated severing specifically at microtubule intersections, leading to the generation of new microtubules at these locations. We show how this activity serves as the basis for a mechanism that amplifies microtubules orthogonal to the initial array, thereby driving array reorientation. Our observations show how severing is used constructively to build a new microtubule array.

DOI: 10.1126/science.1245533

7 Figures and Tables

020402014201520162017
Citations per Year

72 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 72 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Lindeboom2013AMF, title={A mechanism for reorientation of cortical microtubule arrays driven by microtubule severing.}, author={Jelmer J. Lindeboom and Masayoshi Nakamura and Anneke Hibbel and Kostya Shundyak and Ryan Gutierrez and Tijs Ketelaar and Anne Mie C. Emons and Bela M Mulder and Viktor Kirik and David W. Ehrhardt}, journal={Science}, year={2013}, volume={342 6163}, pages={1245533} }