A mechanism for impaired fear recognition after amygdala damage

@article{Adolphs2005AMF,
  title={A mechanism for impaired fear recognition after amygdala damage},
  author={R. Adolphs and F. Gosselin and T. Buchanan and D. Tranel and P. Schyns and A. Damasio},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={433},
  pages={68-72}
}
Ten years ago, we reported that SM, a patient with rare bilateral amygdala damage, showed an intriguing impairment in her ability to recognize fear from facial expressions. Since then, the importance of the amygdala in processing information about facial emotions has been borne out by a number of lesion and functional imaging studies. Yet the mechanism by which amygdala damage compromises fear recognition has not been identified. Returning to patient SM, we now show that her impairment stems… Expand
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