A maze-lover's dream: Burrow architecture, natural history and habitat characteristics of Ansell's mole-rat (Fukomys anselli)

@article{klba2012AMD,
  title={A maze-lover's dream: Burrow architecture, natural history and habitat characteristics of Ansell's mole-rat (Fukomys anselli)},
  author={J. {\vS}kl{\'i}ba and V. Mazoch and H. Patzenhauerov{\'a} and Ema Hrouzkov{\'a} and Matěj L{\"o}vy and O. Kott and R. {\vS}umbera},
  journal={Mammalian Biology},
  year={2012},
  volume={77},
  pages={420-427}
}
The Ansell’s mole-rat (Fukomys anselli, Bathyergidae) is a small-sized social subterranean rodent whose distribution is confined to the Lusaka area in Zambia. It is an established model species for various laboratory studies, but until now the knowledge of its biology under natural conditions has been limited. Here, we provide the first comprehensive natural history and ecological data on a free living population from Miombo woodland. The Ansell’s mole-rat lives in groups of up to 13… Expand
Variability of space-use patterns in a free living eusocial rodent, Ansell’s mole-rat indicates age-based rather than caste polyethism
TLDR
An attempt to detect polyethism in the free-living Ansell’s mole-rat (Fukomys anselli) as differences in individuals’ space-use patterns was made. Expand
Burrow Architecture of the Damaraland Mole-Rat (Fukomys damarensis) from South Africa
TLDR
It is shown that colony size influences the size and complexity of the burrow system, with larger colonies having a longerBurrow system covering a greater area with more secondary tunnels than that of smaller colonies. Expand
Parentage analysis of Ansell's mole‐rat family groups indicates a high reproductive skew despite relatively relaxed ecological constraints on dispersal
TLDR
It is proposed that the extent ecological conditions affect reproductive skew may be markedly affected by life history and natural history traits of the particular species and genera. Expand
Thermal biology of a strictly subterranean mammalian family, the African mole-rats (Bathyergidae, Rodentia) - a review.
  • R. Šumbera
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of thermal biology
  • 2019
TLDR
An ordination analysis was conducted using published data on mole-rat body temperature, thermoneutral zone, resting metabolic rate and thermal conductance, and shows that the naked mole-rats is comparable to the other mole- rat species in these physiological characteristics. Expand
Do subterranean mammals use the Earth’s magnetic field as a heading indicator to dig straight tunnels?
TLDR
It is suggested that the Earth’s magnetic field acts as a common heading indicator, facilitating to keep the course of digging in subterranean mammals. Expand
Social and Environmental Influences on Daily Activity Pattern in Free-Living Subterranean Rodents
TLDR
Monitoring of outside-nest activity in eusocial mole-rat species concluded that social cues in communally nesting mole-rats may disrupt (mask) temperature-related daily activity rhythms but probably only if the additional cost of thermoregulation is not too high, as it likely is in the Ansell’s mole- rat. Expand
Temperature preferences of African mole-rats (family Bathyergidae).
TLDR
It is suggested that while soil temperature is decisive during digging as the mole-rats warm up or cool due to tight contact between body and soil (conduction), resting animals prevent heat loss through conduction by building a nest. Expand
Brain atlas of the African mole‐rat Fukomys anselli
TLDR
A comprehensive atlas of the Ansell's mole‐rat brain based on Nissl and Klüver‐Barrera stained sections is presented, identifying and label 375 brain regions and discussing selected differences from the brain of the closely related naked mole‐ rat as well as from epigeic mammals (rat). Expand
Burrow systems of mole-rats as refuges for frogs in the Miombo woodlands of south-east Africa
TLDR
Frogs are known to occasionally utilize the burrow systems of subterranean rodents, but this phenomenon has previously attracted little attention, so it is speculated that in areas with prolonged dry seasons mole-rats may increase anuran abundances and diversity. Expand
Vocal repertoire of the social Mashona mole-rat (Fukomys darlingi) and how it compares with other mole-rats
TLDR
The vocal repertoire of the Mashona mole-rat is less rich compared to other social mole-rats, corresponding with its low mean family size, but this species has a higher diversity in contact and distress calls, while using a relatively low number of aggressive signals. Expand
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The silvery mole-rat Heliophobius argenteocinereus (Bathyergidae) is a solitary subterranean rodent, widely distributed throughout eastern and south-eastern Africa in a variety of habitats. Here, weExpand
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TLDR
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