A matter of persistence: differential Late Pleistocene survival of two rocky-shore idoteid isopod species in northern Japan

@article{Hiruta2017AMO,
  title={A matter of persistence: differential Late Pleistocene survival of two rocky-shore idoteid isopod species in northern Japan},
  author={Shimpei F Hiruta and Maho Ikoma and Toru Katoh and Hiroshi Kajihara and Matthew H Dick},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2017},
  volume={799},
  pages={151-179}
}
The expansion–contraction (EC) model of Pleistocene biogeography and the concept of refugia are of dubious applicability for rocky-shore marine species along the northwest Pacific coast, which was not glaciated at the last glacial maximum (LGM) and likely remained largely habitable by marine communities. We examined the population structure and historical demography of two ecologically similar rocky-intertidal idoteid isopods, Idotea ochotensis and Cleantiella isopus, in northern Japan based on… 
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