A low-temperature origin for the planetesimals that formed Jupiter

@article{Owen1999ALO,
  title={A low-temperature origin for the planetesimals that formed Jupiter},
  author={T. Owen and P. Mahaffy and H. Niemann and S. Atreya and T. Donahue and A. Bar-Nun and I. Pater},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={402},
  pages={269-270}
}
The four giant planets in the Solar System have abundances of ‘metals’ (elements heavier than helium), relative to hydrogen, that are much higher than observed in the Sun. In order to explain this, all models for the formation of these planets rely on an influx of solid planetesimals. It is generally assumed that these planetesimals were similar, if not identical, to the comets from the Oort cloud that we see today. Comets that formed in the region of the giant planets should not have contained… Expand

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