A longitudinal investigation of reading outcomes in children with language impairments.

@article{Catts2002ALI,
  title={A longitudinal investigation of reading outcomes in children with language impairments.},
  author={Hugh William Catts and Marc E. Fey and J. Bruce Tomblin and Xuyang Zhang},
  journal={Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR},
  year={2002},
  volume={45 6},
  pages={
          1142-57
        }
}
  • H. CattsM. Fey Xuyang Zhang
  • Published 1 December 2002
  • Psychology, Education
  • Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
This investigation examined the reading outcomes of children with language impairments (LI). A large subsample of children who participated in an epidemiologic study of language impairments in kindergarten (J. B. Tomblin, N. Records, P. Buckwalter, X. Zhang, E. Smith, & M. O'Brien, 1997) was followed into second and fourth grades. Participants' language, reading, and nonverbal cognitive abilities were assessed. Results indicated that children with LI in kindergarten were at a high risk for… 

Reading achievement growth in children with language impairments.

This analysis showed that children with LI differed significantly from children with TL in initial level (2nd grade) of word recognition and reading comprehension, but they did not differ significantly in the shape of their growth trajectories.

Understanding Risk for Reading Difficulties in Children With Language Impairment.

It is suggested that risk of reading difficulty for children with language impairment can be reliably estimated in preschool, prior to the onset of formal reading instruction.

Estimating the Risk of Future Reading Difficulties in Kindergarten Children: A Research-Based Model and Its Clinical Implementation.

Findings indicated that five kindergarten variables uniquely predicted reading outcome in second grade, including letter identification, sentence imitation, phonological awareness, rapid naming, and mother's education.

Early Writing Deficits in Preschoolers With Oral Language Difficulties

The findings from this study show that as early as preschool, children with weaker oral language skills lag behind their peers with stronger orallanguage skills in terms of their writing-related skills.

Language and speech predictors of reading achievement in preschool children with language disorders

LANGUAGE AND SPEECH PREDICTORS OF READING ACHIEVEMENT IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE DISORDERS by Juliet K. Haarbauer-Krupa The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the relationship

A Preliminary Comparison of Reading Subtypes in a Clinical Sample of Children With Specific Language Impairment.

The results indicate that the patterns of reading subtypes differ among children with SLI and children with typical language, highlighting the importance of simultaneously but separately considering word-level and text-level skills in studies of reading impairment.

Associated Reading Skills in Children with a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

A large cohort of 200 eleven-year-old children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) were assessed on basic reading accuracy and on reading comprehension as well as language tasks. Reading skills

Reading trajectories of children with language difficulties from preschool through fifth grade.

Results supported the compensatory trajectory of development and speech-language pathologists are encouraged to adopt evidence-based practices in order to boost reading outcomes for children with LD beginning in preschool.

What influences literacy outcome in children with speech sound disorder?

Results support previous literature findings that SSD history predicts literacy difficulties and that the association is strongest for SSD + language impairment (LI).
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 58 REFERENCES

Estimating the Risk of Future Reading Difficulties in Kindergarten Children: A Research-Based Model and Its Clinical Implementation.

Findings indicated that five kindergarten variables uniquely predicted reading outcome in second grade, including letter identification, sentence imitation, phonological awareness, rapid naming, and mother's education.

Predicting reading problems in at-risk children.

The results indicate that early measures of language awareness are good predictors of later reading performance but that different measures of this awareness areGood predictors for different children.

Language-impaired preschoolers: a follow-up into adolescence.

A longitudinal follow-up of 71 adolescents with a preschool history of speech-language impairment, originally studied by Bishop and Edmundson (1987), found that children who still had significant language difficulties at 5;6 had significant impairments in all aspects of spoken and written language functioning, as did children classified as having a general delay.

Language Basis of Reading and Reading Disabilities: Evidence From a Longitudinal Investigation

This study examined the contributions of phonological processing and oral language abilities to reading and reading disabilities in young children. Two approaches were taken. First, 604 participants

Defining language delay in young children by cognitive referencing: Are we saying more than we know?

ABSTRACT One current definition of language delay, on the basis of the Cognitive Hypothesis model, assumes that children who have similar levels of language and cognitive development are unlikely to

A prospective study of the relationship between specific language impairment, phonological disorders and reading retardation.

  • D. BishopC. Adams
  • Psychology
    Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
  • 1990
Language and literacy skills were assessed in 83 8 1/2-year olds whose language development had been impaired at 4 years of age, and there were only weak links between expressive phonological disorders and later ability to read either meaningful text or non-words.

Very early language deficits in dyslexic children.

At 2 1/2 years of age, children who later developed reading disabilities were deficient in the length, syntactic complexity, and pronunciation accuracy of their spoken language, but not in lexical or speech discrimination skills, but early syntactic proficiency nevertheless accounted for some unique variance in grade 2 achievement when differences at age 5 were statistically controlled.

Four-year follow-up study of language impaired children

The results indicated that both the normal and the SLI children continued to develop skills in receptive and expressive language and speech articulation across the 3- to 4-year period intervening between evaluations.

Prevalence of specific language impairment in kindergarten children.

The prevalence estimates obtained fell within recent estimates for SLI, but demonstrated that this condition is more prevalent among females than has been previously reported.

Children with Specific Language Impairment

The language characteristics of SLI - a detailed look at English SLI across languages evidence from nonlinguistic cognitive tasks auditory processing and speech perception and the nature and efficiency of treatment are described.
...