A limiting feature of the Mozart effect: listening enhances mental rotation abilities in non-musicians but not musicians

@article{Aheadi2010ALF,
  title={A limiting feature of the Mozart effect: listening enhances mental rotation abilities in non-musicians but not musicians},
  author={Afshin Aheadi and P. A. Dixon and S. Glover},
  journal={Psychology of Music},
  year={2010},
  volume={38},
  pages={107 - 117}
}
  • Afshin Aheadi, P. A. Dixon, S. Glover
  • Published 2010
  • Psychology
  • Psychology of Music
  • The ‘Mozart effect’ occurs when performance on spatial cognitive tasks improves following exposure to Mozart. It is hypothesized that the Mozart effect arises because listening to complex music activates similar regions of the right cerebral hemisphere as are involved in spatial cognition. A counter-intuitive prediction of this hypothesis (and one that may explain at least some of the null results reported previously) is that Mozart should only improve spatial cognition in non-musicians, who… CONTINUE READING
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