A likelihood approach for comparing synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates, with application to the chloroplast genome.

@article{Muse1994ALA,
  title={A likelihood approach for comparing synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates, with application to the chloroplast genome.},
  author={Spencer V. Muse and Brandon S. Gaut},
  journal={Molecular biology and evolution},
  year={1994},
  volume={11 5},
  pages={
          715-24
        }
}
  • S. Muse, B. Gaut
  • Published 1 September 1994
  • Biology
  • Molecular biology and evolution
A model of DNA sequence evolution applicable to coding regions is presented. This represents the first evolutionary model that accounts for dependencies among nucleotides within a codon. The model uses the codon, as opposed to the nucleotide, as the unit of evolution, and is parameterized in terms of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates. One of the model's advantages over those used in methods for estimating synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates is that it… 

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