A late Pleistocene fossil from Northeastern China is the first record of the dire wolf (Carnivora: Canis dirus) in Eurasia

@article{Lu2020ALP,
  title={A late Pleistocene fossil from Northeastern China is the first record of the dire wolf (Carnivora: Canis dirus) in Eurasia},
  author={Dan-feng Lu and Yangheshan Yang and Qiang Li and Xijun Ni},
  journal={Quaternary International},
  year={2020}
}

Canids (Caninae) from the Past of Venezuela

A review of paleontological material that was published previously, along with newly reported ancient specimens, reveals a distinct historical diversity for the same region of Venezuela and suggests a more complex evolutionary history than previously thought for South American canids.

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