A key to the genera of the Menoponidae (Amblycera: Mallophaga: Insecta)

@article{Clay1969AKT,
  title={A key to the genera of the Menoponidae (Amblycera: Mallophaga: Insecta)},
  author={Theresa. Clay},
  journal={Bulletin of the British Museum of Natural History},
  year={1969},
  volume={24},
  pages={1-26}
}
  • T. Clay
  • Published 1969
  • Biology
  • Bulletin of the British Museum of Natural History
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