A joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox

@article{Prantzos2013AJA,
  title={A joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox},
  author={Nikos Prantzos},
  journal={International Journal of Astrobiology},
  year={2013},
  volume={12},
  pages={246 - 253}
}
  • N. Prantzos
  • Published 27 January 2013
  • Physics
  • International Journal of Astrobiology
Abstract I propose a unified framework for a joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox, which enables a simultaneous, quantitative study of both of them. The analysis is based on a simplified form of the Drake equation and on a fairly simple scheme for the colonization of the Milky Way. It appears that for sufficiently long-lived civilizations, colonization of the Galaxy is the only reasonable option to gain knowledge about other life forms. This argument allows one to define a… 

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