A humid climate state during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

@article{Bowen2004AHC,
  title={A humid climate state during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum},
  author={Gabriel J. Bowen and David J. Beerling and Paul L. Koch and James C. Zachos and Thomas H N Quattlebaum},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={432},
  pages={495-499}
}
An abrupt climate warming of 5 to 10 °C during the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary thermal maximum (PETM) 55 Myr ago is linked to the catastrophic release of ∼1,050–2,100 Gt of carbon from sea-floor methane hydrate reservoirs. Although atmospheric methane, and the carbon dioxide derived from its oxidation, probably contributed to PETM warming, neither the magnitude nor the timing of the climate change is consistent with direct greenhouse forcing by the carbon derived from methane hydrate. Here we… 
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