A hotbed of medical innovation: George Kellie (1770–1829), his colleagues at Leith and the Monro–Kellie doctrine

@article{Macintyre2014AHO,
  title={A hotbed of medical innovation: George Kellie (1770–1829), his colleagues at Leith and the Monro–Kellie doctrine},
  author={Iain Macintyre},
  journal={Journal of Medical Biography},
  year={2014},
  volume={22},
  pages={100 - 93}
}
  • I. Macintyre
  • Published 1 May 2014
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Medical Biography
The Monro–Kellie doctrine is named after two Scottish doctors, the well-known Alexander Monro secundus and George Kellie, whose life and work has not previously been described in detail. After service as a naval surgeon, Kellie followed his father into a career as a surgeon in the port of Leith, near Edinburgh. His publications show him to be a compassionate and observant doctor, ready to question established concepts. He worked closely with surgical colleagues in the town, some of whom made… 

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