A high-energy neutrino coincident with a tidal disruption event

@article{Stein2020AHN,
  title={A high-energy neutrino coincident with a tidal disruption event},
  author={R. Stein and S. Velzen and M. Kowalski and A. Franckowiak and S. Gezari and J. Miller-Jones and S. Frederick and I. Sfaradi and M. Bietenholz and A. Horesh and R. Fender and S. Garrappa and T. Ahumada and I. Andreoni and J. Belicki and E. Bellm and M. Bottcher and V. Brinnel and R. Burruss and S. Cenko and M. Coughlin and V. Cunningham and A. Drake and G. Farrar and M. Feeney and R. Foley and A. Gal-Yam and V. Golkhou and A. Goobar and M. Graham and E. Hammerstein and G. Helou and T. Hung and M. Kasliwal and C. Kilpatrick and A. Kong and T. Kupfer and R. Laher and A. Mahabal and F. Masci and J. Necker and J. Nordin and D. Perley and M. Rigault and S. Reusch and H. Rodriguez and C. Rojas-Bravo and B. Rusholme and D. Shupe and L. Singer and J. Sollerman and M. Soumagnac and D. Stern and Kirsty Taggart and J. Santen and C. Ward and P. Woudt and Y. Yao},
  journal={arXiv: High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena},
  year={2020}
}
Cosmic neutrinos provide a unique window into the otherwise-hidden mechanism of particle acceleration in astrophysical objects. A flux of high-energy neutrinos was discovered in 2013, and the IceCube Collaboration recently associated one high-energy neutrino with a flare from the relativistic jet of an active galaxy pointed towards the Earth. However a combined analysis of many similar active galaxies revealed no excess from the broader population, leaving the vast majority of the cosmic… Expand

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