A high-coverage Neandertal genome from Vindija Cave in Croatia

@article{Prfer2017AHN,
  title={A high-coverage Neandertal genome from Vindija Cave in Croatia},
  author={Kay Pr{\"u}fer and Cesare de Filippo and Steffi Grote and Fabrizio Mafessoni and Petra Korlevi{\'c} and Mateja Hajdinjak and Benjamin Vernot and Laurits Skov and Pinghsun Hsieh and St{\'e}phane Peyr{\'e}gne and David Reher and Charlotte Hopfe and Sarah Nagel and Tomislav Maricic and Qiaomei Fu and Christoph Theunert and Rebekah L. Rogers and Pontus Skoglund and Manjusha Chintalapati and Michael Dannemann and Bradley J. Nelson and Felix M. Key and Pavao Rudan and Željko Ku{\'c}an and Ivan Gu{\vs}i{\'c} and Liubov V. Golovanova and Vladimir Doronichev and Nick J. Patterson and David Reich and Evan E. Eichler and Montgomery Slatkin and Mikkel Heide Schierup and Aida M. Andr{\'e}s and Janet Kelso and Matthias Meyer and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={358},
  pages={655 - 658}
}
Revelations from a Vindija Neandertal genome Neandertals clearly interbred with the ancestors of non-African modern humans, but many questions remain about our closest ancient relatives. Prüfer et al. present a 30-fold-coverage genome sequence from 50,000- to 65,000-year-old samples from a Neandertal woman found in Vindija, Croatia, and compared this sequence with genomes obtained from the Altai Neandertal, the Denisovans, and ancient and modern humans (see the Perspective by Bergström and… 
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TLDR
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