A hierarchical analysis of the scaling of force and power production by dragonfly flight motors.

@article{Schilder2004AHA,
  title={A hierarchical analysis of the scaling of force and power production by dragonfly flight motors.},
  author={Rudolf J Schilder and James H. Marden},
  journal={The Journal of experimental biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={207 Pt 5},
  pages={767-76}
}
Maximum isometric force output by single muscles has long been known to be proportional to muscle mass(0.67), i.e to muscle cross-sectional area. However, locomotion often requires a different muscle contraction regime than that used under isometric conditions. Moreover, lever mechanisms generally affect the force outputs of muscle-limb linkages, which is one reason why the scaling of net force output by intact musculoskeletal systems can differ from mass(0.67). Indeed, several studies have… CONTINUE READING
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