A head-mounted three dimensional display

@inproceedings{Sutherland1968AHT,
  title={A head-mounted three dimensional display},
  author={Ivan E. Sutherland},
  booktitle={AFIPS '68 (Fall, part I)},
  year={1968}
}
  • I. Sutherland
  • Published in AFIPS '68 (Fall, part I) 1968
  • Computer Science
The fundamental idea behind the three-dimensional display is to present the user with a perspective image which changes as he moves. The retinal image of the real objects which we see is, after all, only two-dimensional. Thus if we can place suitable two-dimensional images on the observer's retinas, we can create the illusion that he is seeing a three-dimensional object. Although stereo presentation is important to the three-dimensional illusion, it is less important than the change that takes… Expand
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