A guide to the field of palaeo colour

@article{Vinther2015AGT,
  title={A guide to the field of palaeo colour},
  author={Jakob Vinther},
  journal={BioEssays},
  year={2015},
  volume={37}
}
  • J. Vinther
  • Published 2015
  • Biology, Medicine
  • BioEssays
Melanin, and other pigments have recently been shown to preserve over geologic time scales, and are found in several different organisms. This opens up the possibility of inferring colours and colour patterns ranging from invertebrates to feathered dinosaurs and mammals. An emerging discipline is palaeo colour: colour plays an important role in display and camouflage as well as in integumental strengthening and protection, which makes possible the hitherto difficult task of doing inferences… Expand
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