A great wave: the Storegga tsunami and the end of Doggerland?

@article{Walker2020AGW,
  title={A great wave: the Storegga tsunami and the end of Doggerland?},
  author={James P. Walker and Vincent L. Gaffney and Simon Fitch and Merle Muru and Andrew Fraser and Martin R. Bates and Richard Bates},
  journal={Antiquity},
  year={2020},
  volume={94},
  pages={1409 - 1425}
}
Abstract Around 8150 BP, the Storegga tsunami struck North-west Europe. The size of this wave has led many to assume that it had a devastating impact upon contemporaneous Mesolithic communities, including the final inundation of Doggerland, the now submerged Mesolithic North Sea landscape. Here, the authors present the first evidence of the tsunami from the southern North Sea, and suggest that traditional notions of a catastrophically destructive event may need rethinking. In providing a more… 
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