A giant thunderstorm on Saturn

@article{Fischer2011AGT,
  title={A giant thunderstorm on Saturn},
  author={Georg Fischer and William S. Kurth and Donald A. Gurnett and Philippe Zarka and Ulyana Anatolyevna Dyudina and Andrew P. Ingersoll and Shawn P. Ewald and Carolyn C. Porco and Anthony Wesley and Christopher Y. Go and Marc Delcroix},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={475},
  pages={75-77}
}
Lightning discharges in Saturn’s atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant… 
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Deep winds beneath Saturn’s upper clouds from a seasonal long-lived planetary-scale storm
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