A genetic method for dating ancient genomes provides a direct estimate of human generation interval in the last 45,000 years.

@article{Moorjani2016AGM,
  title={A genetic method for dating ancient genomes provides a direct estimate of human generation interval in the last 45,000 years.},
  author={Priya G. Moorjani and Sriram Sankararaman and Qiaomei Fu and Molly Przeworski and Nick J. Patterson and David Reich},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2016},
  volume={113 20},
  pages={5652-7}
}
The study of human evolution has been revolutionized by inferences from ancient DNA analyses. Key to these studies is the reliable estimation of the age of ancient specimens. High-resolution age estimates can often be obtained using radiocarbon dating, and, while precise and powerful, this method has some biases, making it of interest to directly use genetic data to infer a date for samples that have been sequenced. Here, we report a genetic method that uses the recombination clock. The idea is… CONTINUE READING

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