A functional genetic link between distinct developmental language disorders.

@article{Vernes2008AFG,
  title={A functional genetic link between distinct developmental language disorders.},
  author={Sonja C. Vernes and Dianne F. Newbury and Brett S. Abrahams and Laura M Winchester and J{\'e}r{\^o}me Nicod and Matthias Groszer and Maricela Alarc{\'o}n and Peter L. Oliver and Kay E. Davies and Daniel H. Geschwind and Anthony P. Monaco and Simon E. Fisher},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={359 22},
  pages={
          2337-45
        }
}
BACKGROUND Rare mutations affecting the FOXP2 transcription factor cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. We hypothesized that neural pathways downstream of FOXP2 influence more common phenotypes, such as specific language impairment. METHODS We performed genomic screening for regions bound by FOXP2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation, which led us to focus on one particular gene that was a strong candidate for involvement in language impairments. We then tested for associations… 

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A significant proportion of children suffer from unexplained problems acquiring proficient linguistic skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. These developmental speech and language
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