A functional analysis of social grooming patterns through direct comparison with self-grooming in rhesus monkeys

@article{Boccia2007AFA,
  title={A functional analysis of social grooming patterns through direct comparison with self-grooming in rhesus monkeys},
  author={Maria L Boccia},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2007},
  volume={4},
  pages={399-418}
}
  • M. Boccia
  • Published 2007
  • Psychology
  • International Journal of Primatology
Social grooming in primates is a complex behavior in which monkeys stroke, pick, or otherwise manipulate a companion’s body surface. While grooming has been associated with important social functions, researchers who have examined its physical characteristics, such as body site preferences, have focused on its role in skin care and ectoparasite removal. Whether the form of social grooming is constrained primarily by utilitarian or social functions was empirically tested by directly comparing… Expand

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