A functional analysis of grazing in parrotfishes (family Scaridae): the ecological implications

@article{Bellwood2004AFA,
  title={A functional analysis of grazing in parrotfishes (family Scaridae): the ecological implications},
  author={David R. Bellwood and John Howard Choat},
  journal={Environmental Biology of Fishes},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={189-214}
}
SynopsisThe assumption that parrotfishes represent a single group of grazing herbivores is addressed by morphological, functional and ecological analyses. This assumption is rejected. The 24 scarine parrotfishes from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, are divided into two functional groups: excavators and scrapers. The osteology and myology of the jaws of all 24 species were examined, and a detailed description of a representative species from each group is provided. The relative weights of the… Expand
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Significant differences in CCA coverage, turf height and substrate taphonomy were found among the five parrotfish species, suggesting that interspecific resource partitioning is based on successional stage of feeding substrata. Expand
EVOLUTIONARY HISTORY OF THE PARROTFISHES: BIOGEOGRAPHY, ECOMORPHOLOGY, AND COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY
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A well-established computational model of jaw biomechanics in fishes was used to simulate the mandibular dynamics during feeding of the two dominant reef-dwelling parrotfish species in the Gulf of California, and to infer, to some extent, their potential ecological role. Expand
atterns of bioerosion and sediment release by parrotfishes ( family Scaridae ) on the Great Barrier Reef Bellwood
The patterns of erosion and defaecation by 2 species of parrotfish Chlorurus gibbus and C. sordidus (family Scaridae) were examined at 2 sites on Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. FeedingExpand
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