A fruit in the hand or two in the bush? Divergent risk preferences in chimpanzees and bonobos

@article{Heilbronner2008AFI,
  title={A fruit in the hand or two in the bush? Divergent risk preferences in chimpanzees and bonobos},
  author={Sarah R. Heilbronner and A. Rosati and J. Stevens and B. Hare and M. Hauser},
  journal={Biology Letters},
  year={2008},
  volume={4},
  pages={246 - 249}
}
Human and non-human animals tend to avoid risky prospects. If such patterns of economic choice are adaptive, risk preferences should reflect the typical decision-making environments faced by organisms. However, this approach has not been widely used to examine the risk sensitivity in closely related species with different ecologies. Here, we experimentally examined risk-sensitive behaviour in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus), closely related species whose distinct… Expand
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