A formal theory of the selfish gene

@article{Gardner2011AFT,
  title={A formal theory of the selfish gene},
  author={Andy Gardner and Jonathan Welch},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={24}
}
  • A. Gardner, J. Welch
  • Published 1 August 2011
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Adaptation is conventionally regarded as occurring at the level of the individual organism. In contrast, the theory of the selfish gene proposes that it is more correct to view adaptation as occurring at the level of the gene. This view has received much popular attention, yet has enjoyed only limited uptake in the primary research literature. Indeed, the idea of ascribing goals and strategies to genes has been highly controversial. Here, we develop a formal theory of the selfish gene, using… 

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