A field study of the influence of land management and soil properties on runoff and soil loss in central Spain.

Abstract

Since the 1950s afforestation of degraded land has been the principal means of combatting erosion in a seasonally arid area of central Spain. In the 1970s tree planting of steep hillsides and gully sides was preceded by bench terracing. Experimental sites have been established to monitor runoff and soil losses under mature Pinus forest, 12-year-old Pinus forest, and Cistus matorral. The experiment is being conducted at three scales: large gully or small watershed (c. 3.5 ha), runoff erosion plot (10-21.5 m(2)), and rainfall simulation plot (1 m(2)). Monitoring began in October 1992. Discharge was recorded continuously, while sediment loss and soil moisture content were measured on a storm basis. The paper presents summary data on runoff and soil erosion for the three scales and comments on relationships between land management, site characteristics, and these losses. We stress the crucial role of vegetation and its interrelationship with soil properties such as structure and aggregate stability. Matorral was effective in combatting water and soil loss, but we question the practice of afforesting seasonally arid, steeply sided areas that have highly erodible soils.

DOI: 10.1007/BF00546899

Cite this paper

@article{Williams1995AFS, title={A field study of the influence of land management and soil properties on runoff and soil loss in central Spain.}, author={Andrew G. Williams and J L Ternan and Aurora Elmes and M G Del Tanago and Ra{\'u}l Floriano Blanco}, journal={Environmental monitoring and assessment}, year={1995}, volume={37 1-3}, pages={333-45} }