A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion

@article{Perets2010AFT,
  title={A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion},
  author={Hagai B. Perets and Avishay Gal-yam and Paolo A. Mazzali and David C. Arnett and Daniel Ross Kagan and Alexei V. Filippenko and W. D. Li and Iair Arcavi and S. Bradley Cenko and Derek B. Fox and Douglas C. Leonard and Dae-Sik moon and David. J. Sand and Alicia Margarita Soderberg and J. P. Anderson and Phil A. James and Ryan J. Foley and Mohan Ganeshalingam and Eran. O. Ofek and Lars Bildsten and Gijs Nelemans and Ken J. Shen and Nevin N. Weinberg and Brian D. Metzger and Anthony L. Piro and Eliot Quataert and Michael Kiewe and Dovi Poznanski},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={465},
  pages={322-325}
}
Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such… 

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A massive star origin for an unusual helium-rich supernova in an elliptical galaxy

It is reported that the observed properties of SN 2005cz, which appeared in an elliptical galaxy, resemble those of SN2005E, a core-collapse supernova at the low-mass end of the range of massive stars that explode.

Supernovae: New explosions of old stars?

Both SN 2005E and SN 2005cz are best explained as products of the core collapse of massive stars at the low (6–12 solar mass) end of massiveness, in the context of the latest thinking on how stars explode.

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