A direct demonstration of functional specialization in human visual cortex

@inproceedings{Zeki1991ADD,
  title={A direct demonstration of functional specialization in human visual cortex},
  author={Semir Zeki and John D. G. Watson and Christian J. Lueck and Karl J. Friston and Christopher Kennard and R. S. J. Frackowiak},
  booktitle={The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
  year={1991}
}
We have used positron emission tomography (PET), which measures regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), to demonstrate directly the specialization of function in the normal human visual cortex. A novel technique, statistical parametric mapping, was used to detect foci of significant change in cerebral blood flow within the prestriate cortex, in order to localize those parts involved in the perception of color and visual motion. For color, we stimulated the subjects with a multicolored abstract… 

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