A diagnosis of crocodile feeding traces on larger mammal bone, with fossil examples from the Plio-Pleistocene Olduvai Basin, Tanzania.

@article{Njau2006ADO,
  title={A diagnosis of crocodile feeding traces on larger mammal bone, with fossil examples from the Plio-Pleistocene Olduvai Basin, Tanzania.},
  author={Jackson Njau and Robert J. Blumenschine},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2006},
  volume={50 2},
  pages={
          142-62
        }
}

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Trace fossils on dinosaur bones reveal ecosystem dynamics along the coast of eastern North America during the latest Cretaceous

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CHAPTER 10 – Feeding in Crocodilians

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