A cross-sectional study of the relationship between job demand-control, effort-reward imbalance and cardiovascular heart disease risk factors

@article{Sderberg2012ACS,
  title={A cross-sectional study of the relationship between job demand-control, effort-reward imbalance and cardiovascular heart disease risk factors},
  author={M. S{\"o}derberg and A. Rosengren and Jenny Hillstr{\"o}m and L. Lissner and K. Tor{\'e}n},
  journal={BMC Public Health},
  year={2012},
  volume={12},
  pages={1102 - 1102}
}
BackgroundThis cross-sectional study explored relationships between psychosocial work environment, captured by job demand-control (JDC) and effort-reward imbalance (ERI), and seven cardiovascular heart disease (CHD) risk factors in a general population.MethodThe sampled consists of randomly-selected men and women from Gothenburg, Sweden and the city’s surrounding metropolitan areas. Associations between psychosocial variables and biomarkers were analysed with multiple linear regression adjusted… Expand
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TLDR
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