A critique of the grandmother hypotheses: Old and new

@article{Peccei2001ACO,
  title={A critique of the grandmother hypotheses: Old and new},
  author={Jocelyn Scott Peccei},
  journal={American Journal of Human Biology},
  year={2001},
  volume={13}
}
  • J. S. Peccei
  • Published 1 July 2001
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • American Journal of Human Biology
The singularity of reproductive senescence in human females has led many investigators to consider menopause an adaptation permitting increased maternal investment in existing progeny. Much of the focus has been on the grandmother hypothesis—the notion that aging women gain an inclusive fitness advantage from investing in their grandchildren. This hypothesis has evolved from an explanation for menopause into an explanation for the exceptionally long postreproductive lifespan in human females… 
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When Grandmothers Matter
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It is shown that in a population that reflects the authors' evolutionary past, grandmothers do not have an important role for child survival and the implications for the study of cognitive ageing as put forward by Herndon are reacted.
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