A critical ligamentous mechanism in the evolution of avian flight

@article{Baier2007ACL,
  title={A critical ligamentous mechanism in the evolution of avian flight},
  author={David B Baier and Stephen M. Gatesy and Farish A. Jenkins},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={445},
  pages={307-310}
}
Despite recent advances in aerodynamic, neuromuscular and kinematic aspects of avian flight and dozens of relevant fossil discoveries, the origin of aerial locomotion and the transition from limbs to wings continue to be debated. Interpreting this transition depends on understanding the mechanical interplay of forces in living birds, particularly at the shoulder where most wing motion takes place. Shoulder function depends on a balance of forces from muscles, ligaments and articular cartilages… Expand
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