A cortex-like canonical circuit in the avian forebrain

@article{Stacho2020ACC,
  title={A cortex-like canonical circuit in the avian forebrain},
  author={Martin Stacho and Christina Herold and Noemi Rook and Hermann Wagner and Markus Axer and Katrin Amunts and Onur G{\"u}nt{\"u}rk{\"u}n},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={369}
}
Basic principles of bird and mammal brains Mammals can be very smart. They also have a brain with a cortex. It has thus often been assumed that the advanced cognitive skills of mammals are closely related to the evolution of the cerebral cortex. However, birds can also be very smart, and several bird species show amazing cognitive abilities. Although birds lack a cerebral cortex, they do have pallium, and this is considered to be analogous, if not homologous, to the cerebral cortex. An… Expand
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