A contribution to the mathematical theory of epidemics

@article{KermackACT,
  title={A contribution to the mathematical theory of epidemics},
  author={William Ogilvie Kermack and {\`A}. G. Mckendrick},
  journal={Proceedings of The Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  volume={115},
  pages={700-721}
}
  • W. O. Kermack, À. Mckendrick
  • Published 1 August 1927
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of The Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
(1) One of the most striking features in the study of epidemics is the difficulty of finding a causal factor which appears to be adequate to account for the magnitude of the frequent epidemics of disease which visit almost every population. It was with a view to obtaining more insight regarding the effects of the various factors which govern the spread of contagious epidemics that the present investigation was undertaken. Reference may here be made to the work of Ross and Hudson (1915-17) in… 
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References

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