A comprehensive morphological analysis of talpid moles (Mammalia) phylogenetic relationships

@article{SnchezVillagra2006ACM,
  title={A comprehensive morphological analysis of talpid moles (Mammalia) phylogenetic relationships},
  author={Marcelo R. S{\'a}nchez-Villagra and In{\'e}s. Horovitz and Masaharu Motokawa},
  journal={Cladistics},
  year={2006},
  volume={22}
}
Some talpid moles show one of the most specialized suites of morphological characters seen among small mammals. Fossorial and more generalized shrew‐looking moles inhabit both North America and Eurasia but these land masses share none of the same genera. One of the central questions of mole evolution has been that of how many times specialized fossorial habits evolved. We investigated the origin of mole characters with a maximum parsimony analysis of 157 characters, mostly craniodental and… Expand
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