A comparison of vacuum sampling versus sweep-netting for arthropod biodiversity measurements in California coastal sage scrub

Abstract

The recent growth of conservation biology has demanded that faster and more effective measures of biodiversity be utilized. Arthropods, due to high levels of diversity and their relative ease of capture, are often the subject of such surveys. The vacuum sampler, used quite often in the context of agricultural arthropod surveys, has never been adequately evaluated or compared to more traditional collection techniques in relatively complex ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the vacuum sampler was more or less effective than a sweep-net in measuring arthropod biodiversity in California coastal sage scrub. The results show that significantly more individuals were collected by the vacuum sampler per unit effort for three out of six orders of arthropods examined. In addition, the vacuum sampler collected a significantly greater number of arthropod species than the sweep-net technique for two out of the six orders sampled. There were no significant differences in the number of species collected for the remaining four orders. We feel these findings are important for arthropod biodiversity studies utilized for conservation efforts as the vacuum sampler can attain a level of efficiency and sensitivity (with regard to species detection) that sweep-net techniques cannot. © Rapid Science Ltd. 1998

DOI: 10.1023/A:1009653021706

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Cite this paper

@article{Buffington2004ACO, title={A comparison of vacuum sampling versus sweep-netting for arthropod biodiversity measurements in California coastal sage scrub}, author={Melanie L. Buffington and Richard A. Redak}, journal={Journal of Insect Conservation}, year={2004}, volume={2}, pages={99-106} }