A comparison of physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, and provision of an educational booklet for the treatment of patients with low back pain.

@article{Cherkin1998ACO,
  title={A comparison of physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, and provision of an educational booklet for the treatment of patients with low back pain.},
  author={D. Cherkin and R. Deyo and M. Batti{\'e} and J. Street and W. Barlow},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={1998},
  volume={339 15},
  pages={
          1021-9
        }
}
BACKGROUND AND METHODS There are few data on the relative effectiveness and costs of treatments for low back pain. We randomly assigned 321 adults with low back pain that persisted for seven days after a primary care visit to the McKenzie method of physical therapy, chiropractic manipulation, or a minimal intervention (provision of an educational booklet). Patients with sciatica were excluded. Physical therapy or chiropractic manipulation was provided for one month (the number of visits was… Expand

Paper Mentions

Treatment of Patients with Low Back Pain: A Comparison of Physical Therapy and Chiropractic Manipulation
Low back pain (LBP) is a pandemic and costly musculoskeletal condition in the United States. Patients with LBP may endure surgery, injections, and expensive visits to emergency departments. SomeExpand
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