A comparison of oral motor and production training for children with speech sound disorders.

@article{Forrest2008ACO,
  title={A comparison of oral motor and production training for children with speech sound disorders.},
  author={K. Forrest and Jenya Iuzzini},
  journal={Seminars in speech and language},
  year={2008},
  volume={29 4},
  pages={
          304-11
        }
}
Despite the many debates about the usefulness of nonspeech oral motor exercises (NSOMEs) in the treatment of speech disorders, few controlled experiments have evaluated their efficacy in the remediation of phonological/articulatory disorders (PADs). More importantly, the relative effect of NSOMEs compared with traditional production treatment (PT) has not been established. The current study employed an alternating treatment design to evaluate changes in production of sounds targeted by NSOMEs… Expand
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