A comparative study of parental care between two rodent species: implications for the mating system of the mound-building mouse Mus spicilegus

@article{Patris2000ACS,
  title={A comparative study of parental care between two rodent species: implications for the mating system of the mound-building mouse Mus spicilegus
},
  author={Bruno Patris and Claude Baudoin},
  journal={Behavioural Processes},
  year={2000},
  volume={51},
  pages={35-43}
}
Paternal care is uncommon in mammals where males are more often involved in sexual competition than in providing care for their own offspring. However some species present some form of paternal care and, most of the time, this phenomenon is associated with a monogamous mating system. Mice of the genus Mus, such as the house mouse Mus musculus domesticus, are commonly considered to be polygamous-polygynous species. In Mus spicilegus, the mound-building mouse, previous results on female sexual… Expand

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