A comparative study of autistic subjects' performance at two levels of visual and cognitive perspective taking

@article{Reed1990ACS,
  title={A comparative study of autistic subjects' performance at two levels of visual and cognitive perspective taking},
  author={Taffy Reed and Candida C. Peterson},
  journal={Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
  year={1990},
  volume={20},
  pages={555-567}
}
  • T. Reed, C. Peterson
  • Published 1 December 1990
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
This study extended previous investigations of autistic subjects' perspective-taking abilities through a within-subjects contrast between two levels each of both visual and cognitive problems with stringent controls against guessing. When compared with normal and mentally retarded subjects', the autistic group's performance supported Baron-Cohen's (1988) hypothesis of a selective deficit for cognitive perspective taking among autistic subjects. Both levels of visual perspective taking… 
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