A comparative law analysis of the standard for admitting scientific evidence: The united states stands alone

@article{Imwinkelried1989ACL,
  title={A comparative law analysis of the standard for admitting scientific evidence: The united states stands alone},
  author={E. Imwinkelried},
  journal={Forensic Science International},
  year={1989},
  volume={42},
  pages={15-31}
}
Abstract In the United States, most courts of law require that a party offering scientific testimony show that the underlying scientific theory has gained general acceptance within the pertinent scientific community. In deciding whether a scientific technique is reliable enough to be admitted, other legal systems consider the extent of the acceptance of the technique as a relevant factor. However, no other legal system — socialist, civil law, or common law — has elevated general acceptance to… Expand
2 Citations

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