A combined algorithm for genome-wide prediction of protein function

@article{Marcotte1999ACA,
  title={A combined algorithm for genome-wide prediction of protein function},
  author={Edward M. Marcotte and Matteo Pellegrini and Michael J. Thompson and Todd O. Yeates and David S. Eisenberg},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={402},
  pages={83-86}
}
The availability of over 20 fully sequenced genomes has driven the development of new methods to find protein function and interactions. Here we group proteins by correlated evolution, correlated messenger RNA expression patterns and patterns of domain fusion to determine functional relationships among the 6,217 proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using these methods, we discover over 93,000 pairwise links between functionally related yeast proteins. Links between characterized and… 

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