A cognitive profile of multi-sensory imagery, memory and dreaming in aphantasia

@article{Dawes2020ACP,
  title={A cognitive profile of multi-sensory imagery, memory and dreaming in aphantasia},
  author={Alexei J. Dawes and Rebecca Keogh and T. Andrillon and J. Pearson},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2020},
  volume={10}
}
For most people, visual imagery is an innate feature of many of our internal experiences, and appears to play a critical role in supporting core cognitive processes. Some individuals, however, lack the ability to voluntarily generate visual imagery altogether – a condition termed “aphantasia”. Recent research suggests that aphantasia is a condition defined by the absence of visual imagery, rather than a lack of metacognitive awareness of internal visual imagery. Here we further illustrate a… Expand
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