A cluster randomised trial of strategies to increase cervical screening uptake at first invitation (STRATEGIC).

@article{Kitchener2016ACR,
  title={A cluster randomised trial of strategies to increase cervical screening uptake at first invitation (STRATEGIC).},
  author={Henry C Kitchener and Matthew Gittins and Oliver Rivero-Arias and Apostolos Tsiachristas and Margaret Cruickshank and Alastair M. Gray and Loretta Brabin and David J. Torgerson and Emma J. Crosbie and Alexandra Sargent and Chris Roberts},
  journal={Health technology assessment},
  year={2016},
  volume={20 68},
  pages={
          1-138
        }
}
BACKGROUND Falling participation by young women in cervical screening has been observed at a time that has seen an increase in the incidence of cervical cancer in the UK in women aged < 35 years. Various barriers to screening have been documented, including fear, embarrassment and inconvenience. OBJECTIVES To measure the feasibility, clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a range of interventions to increase the uptake of cervical screening among young women. DESIGN A cluster… 
A cluster randomized trial of strategies to increase uptake amongst young women invited for their first cervical screen: The STRATEGIC trial
TLDR
Amongst non-attenders, self-sample kits sent and timed appointments achieved an uplift in screening over the short term; longer term impact is less certain.
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TLDR
Targeting long‐term nonattending women with sending or offering the opportunity to order self‐sampling kits further increased the participation in an organized screening program.
Cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase cervical screening uptake at first invitation (STRATEGIC)
TLDR
An economic analysis alongside the STRATEGIC trial, comparing each of seven novel interventions for improving cervical screening uptake with control general practices, suggested that only unrequested self-sampling and timed appointments have a high probability of being cost-effective.
What do young women below national screening age in England think about cervical cancer and cervical screening? A qualitative study.
TLDR
Tailored interventions addressing common concerns and misconceptions around screening may be acceptable to young women and could help to promote screening attendance at first invitation, suggest findings.
Increasing Cervical Cancer Screening Coverage: A Randomised, Community-Based Clinical Trial
TLDR
The study confirms that using individual contact methods and assigning a fixed screening date notably increases participation in screening, and the response to the invitation is strongly dependent on age.
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TLDR
The majority of cervical cancer screening non-participants are not making an active decision not to attend but rather are either unaware or unable to act, which could be used to identify where tailored interventions may be best targeted.
Could changing invitation and booking processes help women translate their cervical screening intentions into action? A population-based survey of women’s preferences in Great Britain
TLDR
Women who are overdue for screening face practical barriers to booking appointments and preferences for alternative invitation and booking methods that might overcome these barriers are explored.
Implementation of HPV Self-sampling in Cervical Screening Programs Increases Participation Rates: A Literature Review
Cervical cancer screening primarily with high risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) proved to be more sensitive, in detecting CIN grade 2 or worse (CIN2 +), than the traditional cervical cytology.
Self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening Including clinical and health economic aspects
Aarnio, R. 2020. Self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening. Including clinical and health economic aspects. Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty
Offering an app to book cervical screening appointments: A service evaluation
TLDR
Just over 10% of cervical screening non-attenders booked an appointment in response to a text message with a link to a downloadable app; however, only one in four of these women booked using the app.
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