A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in New Hampshire: A possible role for toxic cyanobacteria blooms

@article{Caller2009ACO,
  title={A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in New Hampshire: A possible role for toxic cyanobacteria blooms},
  author={Tracie A. Caller and James W Doolin and James Haney and Amanda Murby and Katherine G West and Hannah E Farrar and Andrea Ball and Brent T. Harris and Elijah W. Stommel},
  journal={Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis},
  year={2009},
  volume={10},
  pages={101 - 108}
}
Abstract Cyanobacteria produce many neurotoxins including ß-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) that has been liked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neurodegenerative disease. A number of ALS cases have been diagnosed among residents of Enfield, NH, a town encompassing a lake with a history of cyanobacteria algal blooms. To investigate an association between toxic cyanobacterial blooms in New Hampshire and development of ALS, we reviewed records from our institution and other community… 
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The Emerging Science of BMAA: Do Cyanobacteria Contribute to Neurodegenerative Disease?
TLDR
In the late 1990s ethnobotanist Paul Alan Cox visited the indigenous Chamorro people of Guam, sleuthing for cancer cures in the lush rainforest, leading to an increased interest in an unlikely hypothesis: that β-methylamino-ʟ-alanine (BMAA)—a cyanobacterial neurotoxin found in contaminated seafood and shellfish, drinking water supplies, and recreational waters—may be a major factor in these diseases.
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The outcomes support the hypothesis that cyanotoxins increase the risk of ALS, which helps the understanding of the etiology of ALS.
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