A clash of bottom-up and top-down processes in visual search: the reversed letter effect revisited.

@article{Zhaoping2011ACO,
  title={A clash of bottom-up and top-down processes in visual search: the reversed letter effect revisited.},
  author={Li Zhaoping and Uta Frith},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance},
  year={2011},
  volume={37 4},
  pages={
          997-1006
        }
}
  • L. Zhaoping, U. Frith
  • Published 1 August 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
It is harder to find the letter "N" among its mirror reversals than vice versa, an inconvenient finding for bottom-up saliency accounts based on primary visual cortex (V1) mechanisms. However, in line with this account, we found that in dense search arrays, gaze first landed on either target equally fast. Remarkably, after first landing, gaze often strayed away again and target report was delayed. This delay was longer for target "N" We suggest that the delay arose because bottom-up saliency… Expand
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